Boston blog postings

Boston Postings

Earliest: March 16, 2003Latest: June 24, 2017Total: 176

June 8, 2015

Duck Pond on Botolph Street

Some of the Boston brownstone home owners in the Back Bay have a great sense of humor. You can see it various times of the year with unique Christmas lights, awesome winter parking space savers and creative yard design. I think they do some of this to amuse some of the commuters that walk through their neighborhood.

On St. Botolph Street, one of the home owners has a little pond in the front of the house. For most of the year they have the water running and place rubber ducks and frogs around the pond. It's very cute. In the Winter time they stick candy canes in the ground around the small pond.

You can find the pond at 65 St. Botolph Street, about a 1/2 block from the Inn at St Botolph. It's not one of the "must see" tourist attractions, but just something unique to discover how Bostonians make their neighborhood special. While your in the neighborhood you should check out the  SW Corridor Path.

The SW Corridor Path is an public walkway that is above the Orange Line. There's lots of seasonal flowers, dog park and a playground for the kids. In addition you'll get some really good photo opportunities of the Prudential and John Hancock buildings.

February 2, 2015

National Weatherperson's Day

National Weatherperson's Day, also known as National Weatherman's Day, is observed on February 5 primarily in the United States. It recognizes individuals in the fields of meteorology, weather forecasting and broadcast meteorology, as well as volunteer storm spotters and observers. It is observed on the birthday of John Jeffries, one of the United States' first weather observers who took daily measurements starting in 1774.

In the Boston Market the chief Meteorologists are Harvey Leonard - WCVB-TV, - Eric Fisher - WBZ, Pete Bouchard - WHDH and Pete Bouchard - WFXT

This year's National Weatherperson's Day is on February 5th, 2015.

June 14, 2014

Boston Graffiti

The largest graffiti art in Boston is in the Back Bay, and it's so well done that not everyone can see it. On top of some apartment buildings on Clearway Street is the words, 'NOZE'. Each white letter is painted on each individual building.

The graffiti is only visible to some tenants in the Christian Science Center Building, and guest staying in the Sheraton Boston Hotel, Hilton Boston Back Bay.

The NoZe Brotherhood is a collegiate secret society at Baylor University. Founded in Brooks Hall in 1924, the society was originally formed as a joke regarding Leonard Shoaf, a freshman with a large nose. Shoaf's nose was of "such great length and breadth of nostril"that his friends proclaimed they could "form a club around it". [Wikipedia]

April 28, 2014

Bucket List of things to do in Boston before you die

Today the San Francisco Gate posted a blog about the Things you must do in the Bay Area before you die. I put together a suggested list for the Boston Area:

  • Watch planes land from the Logan Airport Tower
  • Saint Patrick's Day Parade
  • Watch the The Saint Anthony's Feast parade in the North End
  • Watch the Boston Marathon on Boylston Street
  • Boston Marathon (Run or Volunteer)
  • Run a Swan Boat tour
  • Run a Duck Boar tour
  • Hot Dog and a Beer at Fenway Park
  • Watch the 4th of July concert on the Esplanade
  • Salem, Mass on Halloween night
  • Sail a boat in the Charles River
  • Dinner at the Top of the Hub
  • Shake hands with the Governor
  • Boston Ghost Tour
  • Skate on Duck Pond
  • Watch First Night fireworks from a room on the Battery Wharf
  • Beanpot Game
  • Walk the stairs to the top of the Prudential Tower
  • Boat trip to Provincetown
  • Go to a Fenway Park opening day game

Am I missing something? Let me know! Send me Feedback and I'll add it to the list.

December 27, 2013

Alternative Prudential Parking

If you plan on spending a couple of hours of shopping at the Prudential. You should know that it will cost you $28. If you spend at least $10 at any store in the Mall you'll only have to pay $12 for 4 hours of parking.

This isn't much of a savings if you are planning on shopping outside of the Prudential, such as Boylston Street and Newbury Street.

An alternative to parking at the Prudential is to park at the Christian Science Center parking garage. There are two entrances one Huntington and another on Massachusetts ave. It's a short walk, 1/2 block, to the entrance to the Prudential Shopping center.

Current Parking rates for the Christian Science Center parking garage:

Up to 3 hours $15
Up to 12 hours $20
Up to 19 hours $30
Up to 24 hours $40

If your going to be spending a lot of time in the Back Bay for shopping or enjoying a nice day, you should consider the Christian Science garage. If your looking for a Taxi, take a walk down Belvidere Street towards the Sheraton Boston Hotel, you'll see a large taxi line up. This is a great place to grab a taxi since they can go in any direction from that location.

Garage Parking Tips: When you enter the garage, drive all the way in. The further you drive in, the less walking you have to do to get out of the garage. Take your ticket with you since your better off paying on the way out.

December 4, 2013

Running Around Fenway Park

Today I ran the street around Fenway Park as part of my training for the 5k Santa Run in Glastonbury CT. I headed over to Fenway Park because I needed to do some Christmas Shopping and I was looking for a Santa Hat for the 5k run. (The Yawkey Way Store didn't have any Santa hats.)

My trip from the Prudential Mall to Fenway Park was fairly easy, I had a slight wait at Massachusetts Ave and then it was a smooth run towards Fenway Park via Westland and Fenway Parkway. This isn't a great running location due to the number of major intersections, but it's a good warm up.

Here's little useful information the total distance around the outside perimeter of Fenway Park is 1k. This makes Fenway park a great place in Boston to practice for a 5k. There are no intersections to cross! There is a soft slope along Yawkey way and Landsdown Street and this gives you some practice with slope running regardless of which direction you run around the park.

If you work in Boston's Back Bay, I would highly recommend running around Fenway Park as part of your training for the next 5k.

September 9, 2013

Amazon Sales Tax

A friendly reminder for Massachusetts residences that Amazon.com will be collecting sales tax on purchases after Nov. 1. This is because it now has an office in Cambridge. (Even thou you can't buy anything from their office.)

This means for Massachusetts residences, that "Cyber-Monday" will technically be on November 1st for Amazon shoppers. Don't think this is true? Well you should have see how busy the stores were around the Framingham area on "Tax Free Weekend." Seems lots of Massachusetts consumers were out and about on a very nice weekend looking for deals on previously taxed items.

No word on if Kindle books will be taxable, since they are electronic delivery. I suspect that they will be a taxable item.

You might be better off doing your Christmas shopping extra early to make sure that Amazon.com has your items in stock. Don't wait till Halloween, as many popular gift items may go out of stock, and if they are out of stock, you may not be able to order them. When they come back in stock, you'll end up paying the sales tax.

Worst case scenario? Take a trip to New Hampshire? No! Support your local businesses that are working hard to keep jobs in Massachusetts.

August 1, 2013
Harcourt Street

Harcourt Street

In the Boston's Back Bay there are some unusual streets, once such street is Harcourt Street. What makes this street  different than other street is how the trees are growing on both sides of the street. All the Oak trees are leading towards the center of the street! This creates an unusual effect when looking and walking down the street.

This is has happened because of the the limited amount of sun that shines in the area. Due to the tall building on both sides of the street, the street gets very little day light and over the years all the Oak trees that were planted on the side of the streets have been leading  towards the center to get the most sun. These trees have been growing this way for at least 50 years.

This isn't the only street in Boston where this is happening, there are some trees around Beacon Hill where you'll see this effect. What makes Harcourt Street special is its best place to see the effect on the street. Since this is a quiet dead end street, its safe to walk down the middle of the street and see how the tree branches are interlacing other tree branches. Note: Other people walk down this street as its a short cut to get to the Back Bay train station.

You can find Harcourt Street near Copley Place and the Prudential Shops. It's about two blocks west of the Hunnington Ave overpath. Something different to check out while your waiting for the Boston Duck Tours. Check out the location on Google Map or on Map Quest.

July 26, 2013
Migutan Rails back bay

Mystery Rails on Ring Road

While walking around Boston's Back Bay, you may notice something strange on the road between the Prudential Center and Shaws Supermarket (Ring Road). If you look down you'll see some metal on the street and sidewalk that run's parallel to the street.

This metal strip is called Migutan Rails, and Boston isn't the only place where you'll see them. The purpose of these strips is to protect water from going underneath the road or sidewalk. That's because much of the Prudential Center and Shaws is built over the Massachusetts turnpike.

You can find Migutan rails almost any place where it's necessary to protect water from going underneath the split slab deck. Such as Parking garages, Plazas and Podium Stadium concourses. You'll find them in Gillette Stadium, Fenway Park, Meadowlands and Yankee Stadium.

If you look carefully you can see a stamp 'Migutan' on the stainless steel capping strips. That's the brand of the system made by EMSEAL Joint Systems located in Westborough, Massachusetts.

July 22, 2013

Huntington Avenue Grounds

This fall marks the 100th anniversary of the World Series. The field, Huntington Avenue Grounds, where the first World Series was played no longer exist, it is now the main part of the Northeastern University campus. In 1993, the Yawkey Foundation put a marker and a statue of Cy Young to show where the pitching mound and home plate use to be.

This is the inscription on the home plate:

The First World Series

On October 1, 1903, the first modern World Series between the American League champions Boston Pilgrims (Later known as the Red Sox) and the National League champions Pittsburgh Pirates was played on this site. General Admission tickets were Fifty Cents. The Pilgrims led by Twenty Eight Game winner Cy Young trailed the series three game to one, but then Swept Four consecutive victories to win the championship five games to three. Home plate sat at this location with the left field fence along the Huntington Avenue Sidewalk.

Directions to the Cy Young statue at the old Huntington Avenue Grounds:

By Public Transportation:
Take the Green Line (E Line) to the Northeastern University Station stop. Head towards Forsyth Street, the intersection you see when you get off the train. Cross the street towards Northeastern University, stay on Forsyth Street. Take a left after you pass by the Bank of America ATM, that pedestrian path is World Series Way. Walk down World Series Way for about 50 yards and you'll see Cy Young statue on your right in a little park.

This is a nice place to visit if your a Red Sox Fan. There's really not much else to see here, there is just a statue and a home plate marker. Have a bit of fun and bring a baseball to see if you can throw a strike.