BBEdit blog postings

BBEdit Postings

Earliest: May 20, 2004Latest: October 16, 2019Total: 41
October 13, 2017

BBEdit 12

Yesterday Bare Bones Software updated BBEdit to Version 12. The feedback from long term customers has been amazing.

B B Edit Fans

Yes, BBEdit has a very strong customer base.

Some Cool Features in Version 12

There are a lot of changes in Version 12, you would expect that with a major release, here are five some of the highlights that I like:

  • Paste Using Filter - You can now apply a filter to any text you paste in. For example you can create a filter to add hyperlinks to certain company phrases.
  • Columns Edit - Now its easy to remove or rearrange data in CSV files.
  • FTP/SFTP Browser - Lots of code cleanup with the FTP/SFTP browser window.
  • Canonize - Allows you to perform batch search replace using a reference file. This is great when you need to run the same file clean up command as part of your daily task.
  • Color Scheme now carries over to the sidebar

ColorScheme_thumb.jpg
The Editor window difference between version 11 and version 12 of BBEdit.
Click on image for a larger version.

Complete details are listed on theirBBEdit 12.0 Release Notes.

Are You Using Completion Correctly?

One of the Preference changes Bare Bones made was to move the Completion into its own category. I actually had it turned off because I wasn't really using it that much. Big Mistake!

BBEdit text completion makes typing HTML commands so much easier. You don't need to use the HTML Markup Tools palette. Simply type in the first few letter and then select the text completion that works for you.

For example, Typing in the words 'an' will bring up the anchor drop down. Hit Return then type the URL then Tab then the text you wish to link. It's a lot faster than bring up the anchor dialog box.

It might take a few tried to get used to it, but once you have gotten used to it, it will speed up your HTML work.

Create a BootStrap Panel Text Completion

If you do any work with Twitter's Bootstrap your probably creating a lot of panels. Here's a simple step to add a panel to BBEdit Text Completion so that it will be super easy to create panels.

To get you started, copy the following text to a BBEdit file:

<DIV class="panel panel-default"><div class="panel-heading"><h3 class="panel-title"></div>
<div class="panel-body">

</div></div>

Highlight the text, right click and select "Save Selection as Clipping..."

cryan

Call it whatever you want, the name is important because that's going to be your Text Completion trigger. Mine is simply: panel.

Create a new set and call it Bootstrap. This will help you organize common Clippings

BBEdit Panel

Test it out! Type in the word 'panel' in any BBEdit document and you should see the drop down.

How awesome is that! Now you can create text completions for all your panel types. Don't forget to add one for Wells and responsive Tables too!

Getting BBEdit

You can download a trial version of BBEdit from their website. You'll have 30 days to try out all the features.

March 1, 2017

Emoji on the Command Line

In today's environment, Developers and QA engineers quite often have to log in to a remote AWS server that has virtual servers to perform tasks. Sometimes they are busy and may forget which server they are monitoring. One way to fix this is to use the emoji name in the Macintosh prompt. This way you know that your back on your computer and not on any production AWS server.

You will need to use Apple's Terminal app to add Emoji to the prompt, as iTerm doesn't really have good emoji support. This isn't an issue since your not going to be using emoji all the time.

Enable Emoji at the Command Line

Open Terminal app and use nano to modify the .bash_profile file:

nano .bash_profile

Tech Note: This will not work using BBEdit. This functionality appears to be an exclusive functionality of the Terminal app.

Add a new line like the following:

PS1=" "

PS1 is the Bash variable for Prompt.

Now pull down the "Edit" menu and choose "Special Characters", then select "Emoji" from the special character menu

Find the Emoji you want to use in the shell prompt, I would suggest an Apple or the House. Then drag & drop it into the PS1=" " line so that it's contained within the quotes.

Save the .bash_profile change with Control+O then exit out of nano with Control+X

Open a new Terminal window to see the emoji as the prompt

Bash Login

What is Nano?

nano is a small, free and friendly editor which aims to replace Pico, the default editor included in the non-free Pine package. Rather than just copying Pico's look and feel, nano also implements some missing (or disabled by default) features in Pico, such as "search and replace" and "go to line and column number".

Bash Generator

If you want more out of your Bash Prompt, check out the Bash Generator where you can create a productive Bash Prompt.

February 28, 2017

Chrome Flash Shockwave File

Chrome has implemented some strict security that may prevent embedded website's YouTube videos from playing on auto-load. If you have Google's Chrome Canary and visit some websites, you may find that a mystery file gets downloaded.

If you open the mystery file in BBEdit, you may find the following:

Google Chrome File

Notice that the file starts with CWS. This indicates that the downloaded file is a Flash Shockwave file. This Shockwave file format is no longer being supported by Chrome, and other browsers may soon follow.

Why did the file get downloaded?

Chrome doesn't know what to do with the file, so instead of playing it, the file gets downloaded.

Ignoring the file, instead of downloading would have been a been a better solution.

You can get some additional background information from user kryptkat over on programming.com tech board:

https://cboard.cprogramming.com/tech-board/126640-cws-youtube-problem.html

Quick Solution for Web Developers

If this is happening to files on your website. You are probably using an old Embedded link to YouTube. The easy solution is to get the latest Embed URL from YouTube.

If your using YouTube anyplace on your website, you should download Chrome's Canary and browse your site.

Google Canary is Google's Developer Browser, it contains the latest and great code base that developers are testing before it become in the mainstream Google Chrome browser.

October 28, 2016

Panic.com's Transmit

Transmit Icon

I have been a long time fan of Panic?s Transmit software. I first purchase Panic 3, on September 27, 2006. Today it's my day-to-day application for transferring files from my computer to any remote server.

Panic.com description of Transmit:

You need to transfer files. Maybe to an FTP or SFTP server, or the cloud via Amazon S3, or using WebDAV. You maintain a website, do backups, or upload photos. You need Transmit, the #1 Mac OS X FTP client. Now, in Transmit 4, we took everything good about Transmit and added a dollop of unbelievably great.

Why Transmit?

Macintosh users are a lot of choices when it comes to transferring files via sftp: Cyberduck, Interarchie, Forklift, Yummy FTP, Fetch, Flow and some others.

Back in 2006, when I was looking at various sftp applications, I felt that Transmit interface and functions were better than anyone else. I haven't found any issues with the application that has made me switch to a different application.

Specifically there are three cool features that I like using with Transmit; DockSend, Droplet and Transmit Disk.

DockSend

DockSend automatically uploads files or folders dropped on Transmit's icon in the doc. The file gets sent to the correct equivalent location on a server.

This allows you the ability to send files to a server quickly. You don't need to open up Transmit, then pick the server and then drag the file to the server.

I use DockSend to easily upload my blog images to the server:

Droplet

If you have multiple services that you upload files to all the time, then Droplet is perfect for you.

You simply drag and drop a file on the droplet application icon and within seconds the file is uploaded to the server.

Droplets are a convenient way for non-technical users to upload files to a pre-set location. You can set up a droplet and have someone else upload files to your server.

The neat thing about droplets is that you can change the icon to something different, so it's easy to figure out where the file is going.

Transmit Disk

Transmit Disk allows you to mount your SFTP as a disk on your Mac Desktop. You can easily move files as you would any other Macintosh folder.

The neat thing about this, is that when you copy files from the server to your computer it keeps the file create date the same as the one on the server. I like this because I can back up old files on the server and know that my backup version will have the correct file date and not the date of the backup.

Transmit makes it easy to access your favorite remote servers from the menu.

Transmit Supports AppleScript!

AppleScript gives you more flexibility to perform certain tasks without having to remember them. Don't think AppleScript is useful for an FTP application? Check out three examples of how I integrate AppleScript and Transmit:

  • Every morning I get the latest server.log file
  • On the server, I have a cron job to do a weekly archive my database files and I use AppleScript to get the database dump so I don't have to think about it.
  • I use AppleScript to log files that I put on the server.

AppleScript is a bit complicated to setup for everyday users, but I certainly help to understand some of the fundamentals. If you want to get the basics I highly recommend Up and Running with AppleScript on Lyndia.com.

Make the Move

I would highly recommend Panic.com?s Transmit application, it?s certainly worth the $33.99 cost in the Apple store. This is a great utility to have and worth the investment, if you manage any website.

What about Panic Coda?

I have been very interested in Panic's Coda, an all in one FTP/Editor/Mysql application. (I even set up a Google News Alert if it goes on sale) I haven't made the switch because I am a big fan of BBEdit and I don't see switching to another text editor anytime soon.

September 9, 2016

TextSoap

Text Soap Logo

Stop manually fixing text documents and emails. TextSoap, from Unmarked Software, is a fast way to automate away all that tediousness.

TextSoap automatically remove unwanted characters, fix messed up carriage returns, and pretty much anything else you can think. There are 100 different built-in actions at your disposal. TextSoap has a very neat library where actions are sorted out so they are easy to find.

Save time & effort. Be more productive.

Clean Text Early and Often

There is a cleaner called Scrub, and they describe it : ?This cleaner addresses 90% of text cleaning needs. Like a multivitamin, it gives you more than one cleaner in a single shot, stopping spaces, forwarding characters, MIME encoded characters (%Hex, =Hex), and paragraphs. SCRUB calls the cleaners in a proper order to ensure the best results." Basically, it?s TextSoap version of ?Buy Now.? It?s a one-stop shop to get your text clean up quickly.

TextSoap Been Around

TextSoap isn't new to the market, TextSoap 1.0 was officially released 18 years ago on April 14, 1998. They have been constantly updating the software to make text clean up better. They been around for a while, so they know a thing or two about cleaning up text.

Example: Creating Text to Hyperlink for Jira

Jira Hyperlink

There is one feature that I am trying to get to work in TextSoap and that's the ability to add Hyperlink to text in Rich Text. I haven't been able to get it to work - yet. Once I do I'll update the steps on this blog.

Final Thoughts on TextSoap

If you're looking for a tool that will help clean up your code quickly, then TextSoap is it. With 100 built-in actions you can get started right away.

One reviewer on MacUpdate said:

Customer Quote

I would have to agree.

After playing around with TextSoap for a while, it was hard to find it a productive tool. As an avid BBEdit user, I just couldn't find a justification to spend $44.99. In addition, TextSoap doesn?t seem to handle multiple files modification or dealing with large files. I tested with a large log file and TextSoap crashed when I ran the Scrub command.

The one thing that I did like about TextSoap is that you can manipulate Rich Text files, something that you can't do in BBEdit without BBEdit stripping out the Rich Text format.

Check it for yourself, you can try TextSoap for 30 days. After that you?ll have to pay $44.99 for an individual license or $64.99 for the Family Pac..

September 2, 2016

Preview Bootstrap in BBEdit

BBEdit C D

I have used BBEdit off and on for the past 10+ years. Every single Macintosh that I have own has had a copy of BBEdit on it. I don't remember exactly when I purchased my first version of BBEDit, but I did find a "BBEdit 3.0 Prefs." file on a ZipDisk from 1994.

I still have my BBEdit 6.0 and BBEdit 4.02 CDs, probably got them at MacWorld Boston.

What is BBEdit?

Here's a description of what BBEdit is from the BBEdit 4.0.2 documentation (May 8, 1996):

BBEdit is a high-performance text editor for the Macintosh. Unlike a word processor, whose main purpose it to make it easy to write prose that will eventually find its way to a printed page, a text editor is primarily concerned with manipulating large amounts of text.

BBEdit offers pattern searching and replacing, multi-file searching, sophisticated text transformations, and other features not usually found in word processors.

BBEdit has commands that make it easier to edit specific kinds of text such as source files for programming languages and HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) files for the World Wide Web.

Top Uses of BBEdit

Here's the list of task that I do in BBEdit:

  1. Zap Gremlins - BBEdit Zep Gremlin feature is pure awesome. It removed all Non-ASCII characters, Control characters and replaces with code. Essential when you have to deal with removing smart quotes.
  2. Process Lines Containing - This is a quick and easy way to clean up a large file. I can quickly parse out certain phrases into a separate file.
  3. Sort Lines - I use this when I have a list of items that needs sorting, such as customer name or accounts.
  4. HTML Markup - BBEdit is my go to editor for all my HTML work.
  5. Editing Text Files - Anytime that I have a non-word or rich text file, I'll open it in BBEdit. I have the ability to use any of the text tools if needed.

Preview your Bootstrap pages right in BBEdit

Bootstrap is the most popular HTML, CSS, and JS framework for developing responsive, mobile first projects on the web. Developers like it because it makes it simple to create websites that look great across various platforms. BBEdit?s Preview commands allow you to view your pages in one or more web browsers. With some simple configurations, you can get BBEdit to display HTML using BootStrap CSS.

Via Preview Template

  • Using BBEdit reate a Bootstrap template document with external CSS and Javascript references
  • This document may can contain anything you like but should define the basic structure and appearance of your desired page.
  • Within the document, place a single placeholder: #DOCUMENT_CONTENT#. When you preview a document, the text content will go where #DOCUMENT_CONTENT# appears.
  • Quit BBEdit
  • Go to "~/Library/Application Support/ BBEdit/" and create a new folder called "Preview Templates"
  • Place your Bootstrap template to the folder.
  • Launch BBEdit

Via Preview CSS

  • Quit BBEdit
  • Go to "~/Library/Application Support/ BBEdit/" and create a new folder called "Preview CSS"
  • Copy over your Bootstrap CSS file to the new folder, or simply get the CSS from the bootstrapcdn.com.
  • Launch BBEdit

Now when you want to preview some HTML text, including BootStrap specific CSS, you simply select 'Preview in BBEdit'. Then select the template, or the CSS file.

Getting BBEdit

Download the latest version of BBEdit from their website. There is a 30-Day trial. BBEdit is $49.99 for an Individual license.

July 22, 2016

BBEdit: Process Lines Containing

Using the 'Process Lines Containing' functionality in BBEdit, I can quickly filter out unwanted lines in a log file:

BBEdit Process Lines Containing

(Exabot|Crawler|megaindex|AhrefsBot|bot.html|spider|slurp|yandex|bingbot|majestic12)

I use this when I am looking at the Apache's HTTPd server logs and want to filter out Bots and Google hits to my site.

This will look for each line containing any of the matching text, and if one word is found the line is removed from the file. This saves a ton of time of running multiple grep statements.

You can find the 'Process Lines Containing' under the Text menu in BBEdit. I use it so much that I just assigned a custom Menu key equivalent.

December 4, 2015

Unix Yes

Using Term2, I was looking around some files in the /usr/bin folder to see if there's any cool command line graphic utilities that I could use. In Mac OS X El Capitan (10.11.1) there are 1,052 unix applications in the /usr/bin folder. Many of them I'll probably never use. For example, Why would I ever use eMacs when I have BBEdit?

I did encounter a strange program called 'yes' which sounded weird for a application file name. I checked the description in the manual (man yes) it says that:

manyes.jpg
yes outputs expletive, or, by default, ``y'', forever.

Turns out that's all the application does. So if you type in:

yes testing

You get the word 'testing' on a single line repeated forever. What is the purpose of this application? Why would anyone need to have a phrase repeated endlessly?

A few people have pointed out that it's useful when you encounter a application where you are prompt to fix an error repeatedly. Another user points out that the 'yes' command is useful when you need to test high loads of CPU on a system.

The most useful that I encountered is if you wanted to delete a bunch of files and didn't want to bother saying 'yes' on each state:

yes | rm *.txt

To me it seems to be a weird unix application that encountered.

Largest Files in /usr/bin

While going through all the other applications in the /usr/bin folder, I was thinking what were the largest applications in the directory. So here is the list of the top 20 largest files in the /usr/bin folder:

36M  emacs
10M  php
5.4M  parl5.18
5.2M  parl5.16
3.1M  emacs-undumped
2.1M  db_printlog
2.1M  db_codegen
2.1M  db_load
2.1M  db_hotbackup
2.1M  db_recover
2.1M  db_dump
2.1M  db_checkpoint
2.1M  db_deadlock
2.1M  db_archive
2.1M  db_upgrade
2.1M  db_verify
2.1M  db_stat
1.6M  ssh
1.5M  dig
1.5M  host

You can easily get this information by typing in the following command in Terminal:

ls -lahS

That will get you the listing of all the files in the current directory, sorted by file size. The file size are in blocks which is a bit easier to read for most people. Would you rather see 36M or 37236368?

August 26, 2015

MacBook Pro Laptop

macbookpro

Yesterday I upgraded my Latitude E6520 laptop computer at work to a new MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015). This is the first time in my career that I am using a Macintosh as my primary computer. I have used a Macintosh laptop in the past, but it's always been my personal laptop. It's great having the latest and greatest Macintosh laptop as my primary computer. I do have an iMac at home that I use when I work from home.

I was even more surprised when my desktop was replaced with a Thunderbolt display. My previous setup had a dual monitors with 1080x1950 resolutions; now I have a single monitor with 2560x1440 resolution. (I was able to figure out the resolution by taking a screenshot and then seeing the dimension of the image.)

It's been a long time since I been actively using a Macintosh laptop. My last one was a PowerBook G4 from 2003 and my most recent use would be for simple tasks, such as recording radio broadcasts and using an old version of Photoshop to touch up files. The Powerbook Titanium G4 has 70 GB hard drive and 8 GB of memory. This computer is so much thinner with a 500 GB flash drive and 16 GB of memory. It's amazing the difference of the computers when they are put side to side.

The first set of applications that I installed was TextExpander and Drop Box. I needed TextExpander because that's where I store my website login shortcuts. On Windows, I use Breevy and the application integrates with Text Expander very well. I store the database files in Drop Box and simply link it to my Text Expander on the new computer.

Other applications that were installed right away include Firefox, Evernote, Transmit, BBedit and Pixelmator.

I plan to keep things simple on this laptop. After backing up my Drop Box files to a DVD, I removed most of the files. I realized that there were a lot of files that I just didn't need on a regular bases. I plan to only install only essential applications.

April 10, 2013

BBEdit

As a long time Macintosh user, one of the applications that I really enjoyed using is BBEdit from Bare Bones software. I have been using this software off and on again since 1997. It's been a critical tool for any text issues that I deal with on the Macintosh. There's a lot of really cool things that you can do with BBEdit. Here's two cool features:

Replacing Text in multiple files is one of the reasons people use BBEdit.  We all have some need to replace text, and more often than not it's with multiple files. Over the past 10+ years, I have found that BBEdit is the easiest way to find and replace text in multiple applications. What's cool is that BBEdit also saves your search/replace so that you can reuse the search pair again. Extremely helpful when I needed to replace Window line breaks with Macintosh line breaks or vice verse.

One of the strong points to BBEdit's simple search and replace is the use of Text Factories. This functionality allows you to perform multiple search and replace at the same time. So if I had 200 files that wanted to replace all the line breaks to UNIX format and change the copyright year to 2013, I can do it in one simple action. BBEdit then shows you a report of the changes that it would perform and allow you to decide to accept all changes. Very cool and very powerful.

In short, BBEdit is a great application and worth the $49.99 price. Your getting an application that can be used for any text functionality that you do on your Macintosh. If you tried the application in the past, I encourage you to try it again.