BBEdit Blog Posts

October 28, 2016

Panic.com's Transmit

Transmit Icon

I have been a long time fan of Panic’s Transmit software. I first purchase Panic 3, on September 27, 2006. Today it's my day-to-day application for transferring files from my computer to any remote server.

Panic.com description of Transmit:

You need to transfer files. Maybe to an FTP or SFTP server, or the cloud via Amazon S3, or using WebDAV. You maintain a website, do backups, or upload photos. You need Transmit, the #1 Mac OS X FTP client. Now, in Transmit 4, we took everything good about Transmit and added a dollop of unbelievably great.

Why Transmit?

Macintosh users are a lot of choices when it comes to transferring files via sftp: Cyberduck, Interarchie, Forklift, Yummy FTP, Fetch, Flow and some others.

Back in 2006, when I was looking at various sftp applications, I felt that Transmit interface and functions were better than anyone else. I haven't found any issues with the application that has made me switch to a different application.

Specifically there are three cool features that I like using with Transmit; DockSend, Droplet and Transmit Disk.

DockSend

DockSend automatically uploads files or folders dropped on Transmit's icon in the doc. The file gets sent to the correct equivalent location on a server.

This allows you the ability to send files to a server quickly. You don't need to open up Transmit, then pick the server and then drag the file to the server.

I use DockSend to easily upload my blog images to the server:

Droplet

If you have multiple services that you upload files to all the time, then Droplet is perfect for you.

You simply drag and drop a file on the droplet application icon and within seconds the file is uploaded to the server.

Droplets are a convenient way for non-technical users to upload files to a pre-set location. You can set up a droplet and have someone else upload files to your server.

The neat thing about droplets is that you can change the icon to something different, so it's easy to figure out where the file is going.

Transmit Disk

Transmit Disk allows you to mount your SFTP as a disk on your Mac Desktop. You can easily move files as you would any other Macintosh folder.

The neat thing about this, is that when you copy files from the server to your computer it keeps the file create date the same as the one on the server. I like this because I can back up old files on the server and know that my backup version will have the correct file date and not the date of the backup.

Transmit makes it easy to access your favorite remote servers from the menu.

Transmit Supports AppleScript!

AppleScript gives you more flexibility to perform certain tasks without having to remember them. Don't think AppleScript is useful for an FTP application? Check out three examples of how I integrate AppleScript and Transmit:

  • Every morning I get the latest server.log file
  • On the server, I have a cron job to do a weekly archive my database files and I use AppleScript to get the database dump so I don't have to think about it.
  • I use AppleScript to log files that I put on the server.

AppleScript is a bit complicated to setup for everyday users, but I certainly help to understand some of the fundamentals. If you want to get the basics I highly recommend Up and Running with AppleScript on Lyndia.com.

Make the Move

I would highly recommend Panic.com’s Transmit application, it’s certainly worth the $33.99 cost in the Apple store. This is a great utility to have and worth the investment, if you manage any website.

What about Panic Coda?

I have been very interested in Panic's Coda, an all in one FTP/Editor/Mysql application. (I even set up a Google News Alert if it goes on sale) I haven't made the switch because I am a big fan of BBEdit and I don't see switching to another text editor anytime soon.

September 9, 2016

TextSoap

Text Soap Logo

Stop manually fixing text documents and emails. TextSoap, from Unmarked Software, is a fast way to automate away all that tediousness.

TextSoap automatically remove unwanted characters, fix messed up carriage returns, and pretty much anything else you can think. There are 100 different built-in actions at your disposal. TextSoap has a very neat library where actions are sorted out so they are easy to find.

Save time & effort. Be more productive.

Clean Text Early and Often

There is a cleaner called Scrub, and they describe it : “This cleaner addresses 90% of text cleaning needs. Like a multivitamin, it gives you more than one cleaner in a single shot, stopping spaces, forwarding characters, MIME encoded characters (%Hex, =Hex), and paragraphs. SCRUB calls the cleaners in a proper order to ensure the best results." Basically, it’s TextSoap version of ‘Buy Now.’ It’s a one-stop shop to get your text clean up quickly.

TextSoap Been Around

TextSoap isn't new to the market, TextSoap 1.0 was officially released 18 years ago on April 14, 1998. They have been constantly updating the software to make text clean up better. They been around for a while, so they know a thing or two about cleaning up text.

Example: Creating Text to Hyperlink for Jira

Jira Hyperlink

There is one feature that I am trying to get to work in TextSoap and that's the ability to add Hyperlink to text in Rich Text. I haven't been able to get it to work - yet. Once I do I'll update the steps on this blog.

Final Thoughts on TextSoap

If you're looking for a tool that will help clean up your code quickly, then TextSoap is it. With 100 built-in actions you can get started right away.

One reviewer on MacUpdate said:

Customer Quote

I would have to agree.

After playing around with TextSoap for a while, it was hard to find it a productive tool. As an avid BBEdit user, I just couldn't find a justification to spend $44.99. In addition, TextSoap doesn’t seem to handle multiple files modification or dealing with large files. I tested with a large log file and TextSoap crashed when I ran the Scrub command.

The one thing that I did like about TextSoap is that you can manipulate Rich Text files, something that you can't do in BBEdit without BBEdit stripping out the Rich Text format.

Check it for yourself, you can try TextSoap for 30 days. After that you’ll have to pay $44.99 for an individual license or $64.99 for the Family Pac..

September 2, 2016

Preview Bootstrap in BBEdit

BBEdit C D

I have used BBEdit off and on for the past 10+ years. Every single Macintosh that I have own has had a copy of BBEdit on it. I don't remember exactly when I purchased my first version of BBEDit, but I did find a "BBEdit 3.0 Prefs." file on a ZipDisk from 1994.

I still have my BBEdit 6.0 and BBEdit 4.02 CDs, probably got them at MacWorld Boston.

What is BBEdit?

Here's a description of what BBEdit is from the BBEdit 4.0.2 documentation (May 8, 1996):

BBEdit is a high-performance text editor for the Macintosh. Unlike a word processor, whose main purpose it to make it easy to write prose that will eventually find its way to a printed page, a text editor is primarily concerned with manipulating large amounts of text.

BBEdit offers pattern searching and replacing, multi-file searching, sophisticated text transformations, and other features not usually found in word processors.

BBEdit has commands that make it easier to edit specific kinds of text such as source files for programming languages and HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) files for the World Wide Web.

Top Uses of BBEdit

Here's the list of task that I do in BBEdit:

  1. Zap Gremlins - BBEdit Zep Gremlin feature is pure awesome. It removed all Non-ASCII characters, Control characters and replaces with code. Essential when you have to deal with removing smart quotes.
  2. Process Lines Containing - This is a quick and easy way to clean up a large file. I can quickly parse out certain phrases into a separate file.
  3. Sort Lines - I use this when I have a list of items that needs sorting, such as customer name or accounts.
  4. HTML Markup - BBEdit is my go to editor for all my HTML work.
  5. Editing Text Files - Anytime that I have a non-word or rich text file, I'll open it in BBEdit. I have the ability to use any of the text tools if needed.

Preview your Bootstrap pages right in BBEdit

Bootstrap is the most popular HTML, CSS, and JS framework for developing responsive, mobile first projects on the web. Developers like it because it makes it simple to create websites that look great across various platforms. BBEdit’s Preview commands allow you to view your pages in one or more web browsers. With some simple configurations, you can get BBEdit to display HTML using BootStrap CSS.

Via Preview Template

  • Using BBEdit reate a Bootstrap template document with external CSS and Javascript references
  • This document may can contain anything you like but should define the basic structure and appearance of your desired page.
  • Within the document, place a single placeholder: #DOCUMENT_CONTENT#. When you preview a document, the text content will go where #DOCUMENT_CONTENT# appears.
  • Quit BBEdit
  • Go to "~/Library/Application Support/ BBEdit/" and create a new folder called "Preview Templates"
  • Place your Bootstrap template to the folder.
  • Launch BBEdit

Via Preview CSS

  • Quit BBEdit
  • Go to "~/Library/Application Support/ BBEdit/" and create a new folder called "Preview CSS"
  • Copy over your Bootstrap CSS file to the new folder, or simply get the CSS from the bootstrapcdn.com.
  • Launch BBEdit

Now when you want to preview some HTML text, including BootStrap specific CSS, you simply select 'Preview in BBEdit'. Then select the template, or the CSS file.

Getting BBEdit

Download the latest version of BBEdit from their website. There is a 30-Day trial. BBEdit is $49.99 for an Individual license.

July 22, 2016

BBEdit: Process Lines Containing

Using the 'Process Lines Containing' functionality in BBEdit, I can quickly filter out unwanted lines in a log file:

BBEdit Process Lines Containing

(Exabot|Crawler|megaindex|AhrefsBot|bot.html|spider|slurp|yandex|bingbot|majestic12)

I use this when I am looking at the Apache's HTTPd server logs and want to filter out Bots and Google hits to my site.

This will look for each line containing any of the matching text, and if one word is found the line is removed from the file. This saves a ton of time of running multiple grep statements.

You can find the 'Process Lines Containing' under the Text menu in BBEdit. I use it so much that I just assigned a custom Menu key equivalent.

December 4, 2015

Unix Yes

Using Term2, I was looking around some files in the /usr/bin folder to see if there's any cool command line graphic utilities that I could use. In Mac OS X El Capitan (10.11.1) there are 1,052 unix applications in the /usr/bin folder. Many of them I'll probably never use. For example, Why would I ever use eMacs when I have BBEdit?

I did encounter a strange program called 'yes' which sounded weird for a application file name. I checked the description in the manual (man yes) it says that:

manyes.jpg
yes outputs expletive, or, by default, ``y'', forever.

Turns out that's all the application does. So if you type in:

yes testing

You get the word 'testing' on a single line repeated forever. What is the purpose of this application? Why would anyone need to have a phrase repeated endlessly?

A few people have pointed out that it's useful when you encounter a application where you are prompt to fix an error repeatedly. Another user points out that the 'yes' command is useful when you need to test high loads of CPU on a system.

The most useful that I encountered is if you wanted to delete a bunch of files and didn't want to bother saying 'yes' on each state:

yes | rm *.txt

To me it seems to be a weird unix application that encountered.

Largest Files in /usr/bin

While going through all the other applications in the /usr/bin folder, I was thinking what were the largest applications in the directory. So here is the list of the top 20 largest files in the /usr/bin folder:

36M  emacs
10M  php
5.4M  parl5.18
5.2M  parl5.16
3.1M  emacs-undumped
2.1M  db_printlog
2.1M  db_codegen
2.1M  db_load
2.1M  db_hotbackup
2.1M  db_recover
2.1M  db_dump
2.1M  db_checkpoint
2.1M  db_deadlock
2.1M  db_archive
2.1M  db_upgrade
2.1M  db_verify
2.1M  db_stat
1.6M  ssh
1.5M  dig
1.5M  host

You can easily get this information by typing in the following command in Terminal:

ls -lahS

That will get you the listing of all the files in the current directory, sorted by file size. The file size are in blocks which is a bit easier to read for most people. Would you rather see 36M or 37236368?

August 26, 2015

MacBook Pro Laptop

macbookpro

Yesterday I upgraded my Latitude E6520 laptop computer at work to a new MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015). This is the first time in my career that I am using a Macintosh as my primary computer. I have used a Macintosh laptop in the past, but it's always been my personal laptop. It's great having the latest and greatest Macintosh laptop as my primary computer. I do have an iMac at home that I use when I work from home.

I was even more surprised when my desktop was replaced with a Thunderbolt display. My previous setup had a dual monitors with 1080x1950 resolutions; now I have a single monitor with 2560x1440 resolution. (I was able to figure out the resolution by taking a screenshot and then seeing the dimension of the image.)

It's been a long time since I been actively using a Macintosh laptop. My last one was a PowerBook G4 from 2003 and my most recent use would be for simple tasks, such as recording radio broadcasts and using an old version of Photoshop to touch up files. The Powerbook Titanium G4 has 70 GB hard drive and 8 GB of memory. This computer is so much thinner with a 500 GB flash drive and 16 GB of memory. It's amazing the difference of the computers when they are put side to side.

The first set of applications that I installed was TextExpander and Drop Box. I needed TextExpander because that's where I store my website login shortcuts. On Windows, I use Breevy and the application integrates with Text Expander very well. I store the database files in Drop Box and simply link it to my Text Expander on the new computer.

Other applications that were installed right away include Firefox, Evernote, Transmit, BBedit and Pixelmator.

I plan to keep things simple on this laptop. After backing up my Drop Box files to a DVD, I removed most of the files. I realized that there were a lot of files that I just didn't need on a regular bases. I plan to only install only essential applications.

April 10, 2013

BBEdit

As a long time Macintosh user, one of the applications that I really enjoyed using is BBEdit from Bare Bones software. I have been using this software off and on again since 1997. It's been a critical tool for any text issues that I deal with on the Macintosh. There's a lot of really cool things that you can do with BBEdit. Here's two cool features:

Replacing Text in multiple files is one of the reasons people use BBEdit.  We all have some need to replace text, and more often than not it's with multiple files. Over the past 10+ years, I have found that BBEdit is the easiest way to find and replace text in multiple applications. What's cool is that BBEdit also saves your search/replace so that you can reuse the search pair again. Extremely helpful when I needed to replace Window line breaks with Macintosh line breaks or vice verse.

One of the strong points to BBEdit's simple search and replace is the use of Text Factories. This functionality allows you to perform multiple search and replace at the same time. So if I had 200 files that wanted to replace all the line breaks to UNIX format and change the copyright year to 2013, I can do it in one simple action. BBEdit then shows you a report of the changes that it would perform and allow you to decide to accept all changes. Very cool and very powerful.

In short, BBEdit is a great application and worth the $49.99 price. Your getting an application that can be used for any text functionality that you do on your Macintosh. If you tried the application in the past, I encourage you to try it again.

June 8, 2012

New iMac

Yesterday, my wife surprised me with a new iMac. Wow! What a fantastic gift! I am very excited to have a new computer! My existing computers are about 8-10 years old, so getting a new computer is a very welcome surprise!

As tempting as I was to rip open the box, I decided not to open the box right away. I know of a website that tracks when the best time to purchase an iMac and recommends if it's a good time to purchase.

Sure enough when I checked, I discovered that Apple is overdue on refreshing the iMac product line and new iMacs could be announced as soon as next Monday. So, I decided to wait on opening the box and see what happens on Monday at the WWDC.

Its so hard to wait. Knowing that a new iMac is sitting in the living room, waiting for me to open it and explore all the new features. Intel Processor, Mac OX Lion, Facetime, Thurderbold, AMD graphics, and a nice quiet machine that starts up really fast.

Meanwhile I can start planning...

New Computer, Dual Monitor

When I set up my new iMac, I want to connect my 20" Apple Cinema Display as a second monitor. Fortunitate for me that the Cinema Display uses a DVI port so all I need is a Mini-DVI to DVI Adapter which costs about ~$20 at the Apple store or about $15 in other retail stores online.

Hard Drive Docking Station

The new computer comes with 1TB hard drive, which is pretty much bigger than anything else that I have right now. I'll have to get a hard drive docking station to moved some of my old data to the new computer.

New Software

I'll have to checkout the advantages/disadvantages of various Window emulators such as Parallels, VMWare or Bootcamp. I have some old Virtual PC instances that I may want to merge over to the new computer. However, since I haven't run Windows at home for many years, it may not be worth the effort.

Software Upgrade

I'll have to update several of my applications to use the latest Intel technology. Here's the list of applications that I'll probably upgrade:

That's all I can think of for now. Very excited about getting a new iMac!

January 29, 2008

Less is more

I just notice that I have 92 items in my Application folder on my Powerbook. Wow!! That's a lot of applications to manage. Which got me thinking, is that really worth my time to navigate between all these items?

Yes, having less is more. That is: Less applications means an increase in productivity. For example, learning more about Photoshop will allow me to simplify having multiple graphic applications. Sure iWaterMark, Thumbscrew, Picturesque all do some cool things, but wouldn't it be easier to learn just one application and not have to think about which application to use.

If you are looking for a good source for Macintosh Applications, I suggest looking at iusethis.com. Signup and list your favorite applications and see what others are using. Just for fun, check out what the most popular FTP application is on the Macintosh, the answer may surprise you!

Here's a list of items in my Applications folder:

Acquisition, Address Book, Adium, Adobe Acrobat 7.0 Standard, Adobe Bridge, Adobe Help Center, Adobe InDesign CS2, Adobe Photoshop CS2, Adobe Stock Photos, AOL Instant Messenger (SM) xFFFD, AppleScript, Aqua Data Studio, Art Directors Toolkit 4, Automator, Backup, BBEdit, Calculator, Can Combine Icons, Chicken of the VNC, Citrix ICA Client, CleanArchiver, ColdFusion8, CSSEdit, Dashboard, Delicious Library, DEVONthink Pro, Dictionary, DiscLabel, Disco, DVD Player, eclipse, epson, EPSON Printer Utility, EPSON Scan, Evaluating, Expos, FileInfo, Firefox, Flip4Mac, Font Book, Front Row, Game Room, GraphicConverter, iCal, iChat, Image Capture, iMovie HD, Interarchy, Internet Graphics, iPhoto, iSync, iTunes, iWeb, iWork '06, Journler, KeyCue, Mail, Microsoft AutoUpdate, Microsoft Office 2004, Not Using, OmniGraffle, OmniGraffle Professional, OmniOutliner, OpenTerminalHere, Paparazzi!, Pixadex, Preview, QuickTime Player, RDC Menu, RealPlayer, Remote Desktop Connection, Safari, Scrivener, sidenote, SmartSVN, Snapz Pro X, Spaces, SQLGrinder, Stickies, StuffIt 11, System Preferences, Test Apps, TextEdit, TextMate, Time Machine, Toast 7 Titanium, Transmit, Utilities, Virtual PC, VisualHub
September 19, 2007

Update BBEdit?

I am thinking this week of updating my BBEdit to the latest version 8.7 from 8.2. The upgrade only cost $30.

Since migrating to Textmate last year, I have been using Textmate for all my initial web development. Textmate is an awesome application and I would highly recommend it! However there some features in BBEdit that are pretty cool and worth keeping , here are some examples:

  • If I open up multiple documents from an FTP application, such as Interarchy, BBEdit opens one window and puts all the selected files in a Drawer, which makes it easy to move around files. Thus making it easy when editing multiple files.
  • The color syntax seems to be better in BBEdit than Textmate, the color tones are easier to read.
  • After many years of using BBEdit I am very familiar with all the keyboard shortcuts.

The question is are the new features in BBEdit worth the upgrade? My initial reaction is that there isn't any must-have feature that I should upgrade for. So, for now I'll just use BBEdit 8.2 and Textmate 1.5.6.

To simplify matters, I have two FTP clients in my dock. When I want to use BBEdit, I use Panic's Transmit, when I want to use Textmate I use Interarchy. I think Interarchy and Textmate combination works really well.

I will be checking into Coda, the new application from Panic, which is supposed to be the latest and greatest FTP/Editor tool all in one.

June 14, 2007

Journler

To add content to this Blog, I am now using Journler, By Philip Dow, as my primary writing tool. Journler has a great writing environment and sophisticated tools that I need, such as tagging, organizing content by categories, custom labels, and a pretty good search engine.

I also like the default font that Journler uses: Cochin Regular 14n. However, sometimes I'll switch to Georgia Regular 14. If you use any Journal tool, try using Cochin or Georgia. When writing code I find that Monaco Regular 9 is better font to use, this is due to using BBEdit so much.

I still use TextMate to clean the code prior to going live since it has excellent HTML tools such as Google linking capabilities and entities converter. TextMate has quickly become an important part of my application development.

My day-to-day note-taking tool is still DEVONThink. I use this to store my source code examples and code references. All my personal and business documents are stored in Journler. This decoupling my personal life from my work life.

If your undecided between various Journal/Notetaking applications, I would encourage you to consider using more than one application. Consider one application for you business needs and one for your personal needs.

September 15, 2006

G4 Computer in 2001

G4 2001


Wow has times have changed. The above is the root level listing of my G4 400 series computer on January 21, 2001. This shows you all the applications that I used all the time on my computer.

What I thought was cool then is no longer cool today. What ever happended to CD Master, Fusion Recorder, VideoShop. Six years from now, I wonder what I'll be thinking of the applications that I use today.

The main use of this computer was for video encoding, that's why you see a lot of video applications, such as Video Shop, Media Cleaner and Fusion Recorder.

A lot of thought went into ordering the applications on the main window. The way the listing works is:

  • Top Row are all the Root Folders, including the System Folder.
  • Second Row contains all the importaint applications that I use. With IE, and BBedit being the most frequent.
  • Third Row has all the secondard Applications. Netscape is first because it flows better having it below IE.
  • Forth Row contains Utilities and Video Applications.
  • Fifth Row has all the fun apps
  • Six Row are rarely used but essential applications. Anarchie is on the bottom row because I didn't do much FTP on this computer since I only had dialup access.

May 30, 2006

Dock Items

Every once in a while I'll list the contents of my Dock. The toolbar usually contains the applications that I use the most.

Dock items listed in the order they appear, items are separated by Dock Separators.

  • Finder
  • Safari
  • FireFox
  • Mail
  • Interarchy 7
  • BBedit
  • XCode
  • DEVONthink
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Adobe InDesign CS2
  • Adobe Photoshop CS2
  • Adobe ImageReady CS2
  • Adobe Acrobat 7.0 Standard
  • Dreamweaver 8 (Trial)
  • OmniGraffle
  • OmniOutliner
  • Pages
  • Keynote
  • iWeb
  • iPhoto
  • iTunes
  • Aqua Data Studio
  • Terminal
  • Toast Titanium
  • Chicken of the VNC
  • Remote Desktop Connection
  • Adium
  • TextEdit
August 2, 2005

Macintosh Application

Right now on my Powerbook G4 I have 8 applications open, and these represent the most productive applications that I use at work.
In the order that they appear in the Dock:
  • Safari
  • Apple Mail
  • BBedit
  • Interarchy
  • DEVONthink
  • iTunes
  • Virtual PC
  • Aqua Data Studio
May 19, 2005

Applications

Since I am thinking of updating my laptop, I was going through my list of applications that I currently use. These are the major applications that I have:
  • Acrobat 5 - use to create and Modify PDF douments
  • Adobe Illustrator - use to create Illustrations on the computer
  • Adobe Indesign - perfect for creating booklets and PDF documents
  • Adobe Photoshop - Photo editing tool
  • Audio Hijac Pro - Record radio stations
  • BBedit - Primary HTML editor on the Macintosh.
  • Can Combine Icons - Custom Icons
  • GraphicConverter - Use to browse images.
  • Interarchy - FTP client
  • Microsoft Office - Word/Excel and Powerpoint files
  • SQL4X Manager J - Use to access MySQL and SQL server
  • Sticky Brain - Use to jot down notes and information
  • Toast 6 Titanium - Burn CDs and DVDs on unsupported Mac hardware.
Freeware Applications:
  • Remote Desktop - Microsoft remote desktop tool
  • VNCViewer - VNC client
I created this list so that I can find all the serial numbers and disks. I know programs like Carbon Copy can migrate data between two computers, but I am thinking of doing a fresh install.